Hope | How To Use Hope Correctly?


After I hope, we often use a present tense with a future meaning.

  • I hope she is having a good time.

In negative sentences, we usually put not with the verb that comes after hope.

  • I hope she doesn’t get late. (NOT I don’t hope she gets late.)

I was hoping is used to introduce a polite request.

  • I was hoping you could lend me some money.

I had hoped is used to talk about hopes that weren’t realised.

hopefully

Hopefully can mean I hope. This is a fairly recent usage in British English, and some people consider it incorrect.

  • Hopefully, I am not disturbing you. (I hope I am not disturbing you.)

Hope | Grammar exercise

Complete the following sentences.

1. I hope she —————– the train.

a) will not miss
b) does not miss

2. I hope you ——————– the flowers.

a) like
b) will like

3. I hope the train ——————- soon.

a) come
b) comes

4. I hope he ——————– wake up.

a) will not
b) does not

5. I was hoping you ———————- lend me some money.

a) can
b) could

6. We ——————- that you can come and stay with us.

a) hope
b) are hoping c) Either could be used here

7. I —————- to find a good job soon.

a) hope
b) am hoping c) Either could be used here

8. We hope ——————- Susie while we are in Italy.

a) seeing
b) to see

Answers

1. I hope she does not miss the train.

2. I hope you like the flowers.

3. I hope the comes soon.

4. I hope he does not wake up.

5. I was hoping you could lend me some money.

6. We hope / are hoping that you can come and stay with us.

7. I hope / am hoping to find a good job soon.

8. We hope to see Susie while we are in Italy.