Predicative Position Of Adjectives


Adjectives can be placed after be (is, am, are, was, were) and other copular verbs like look, seem, appear, feel etc. In this case, the adjective describes the subject of the sentence.

Adjectives used only in predicative position

1. Some adjectives beginning with the letter ‘a-‘ are used mainly in predicative position.

Examples are: afraid, afloat, alight, alike, alive, alone, asleep, awake etc.
Before nouns we use other words.

2. The adjectives ill and well are most common in predicative position.
Before a noun, we use other words.




Identify The Adjective | Class 4 Grammar Worksheet


Underline the adjectives in the following sentences. You can learn about adjectives here.

  1. It was a brilliant idea.
  2. She was a kind woman.
  3. I am the right person for this job.
  4. You have done a splendid job.
  5. She is my best friend.
  6. Ram is the tallest boy in the class.
  7. I have bought a special gift for my mother.
  8. That was a foolish thing to do.
  9. I bought twelve apples yesterday.
  10. I saw a white tiger in the zoo.
  11. I don’t know either of them.
  12. Both answers are correct.
  13. She was wearing a blue gown.
  14. There is a tall tree in the backyard.
  15. She was a strong woman.

Answers

  1. It was a brilliant idea.
  2. She was a kind woman.
  3. I am the right person for this job.
  4. You have done a splendid job.
  5. She is my best friend.
  6. Ram is the tallest boy in the class.
  7. I have bought a special gift for my mother.
  8. That was a foolish thing to do.
  9. I bought twelve apples yesterday.
  10. I saw a white tiger in the zoo.
  11. I don’t know either of them.
  12. Both answers are correct.
  13. She was wearing a blue gown.
  14. There is a tall tree in the backyard.
  15. She was a strong woman.



Kinds Of Adjectives Worksheet For Class 4


Underline the adjective and state its kind. You can learn about different kinds of adjectives here.

  1. Rahul is a clever boy.
  2. Rose is a beautiful flower.
  3. Iron is a useful metal.
  4. There is enough milk in the fridge.
  5. The cat drank the whole milk.
  6. Each boy was given a present.
  7. Those apples are ripe.
  8. The dog is eating its breakfast.
  9. This is my bag.
  10. That boy is very lazy.
  11. Many girls participated in the programme.
  12. All children need love.
  13. Neither answer is correct.
  14. He won the first prize.

Answers

  1. Rahul is a clever boy. (Adjective of quality)
  2. Rose is a beautiful flower. (Adjective of quality)
  3. Iron is a useful metal. (Adjective of quality)
  4. There is enough milk in the fridge. (Adjective of quantity)
  5. The cat drank the whole milk. (Adjective of quantity)
  6. Each boy was given a present. (Distributive adjective)
  7. Those apples are ripe. (Demonstrative adjective)
  8. The dog is eating its breakfast. (Possessive adjective)
  9. This is my bag. (Possessive adjective)
  10. That boy is very lazy. (That – demonstrative adjective; lazy – adjective of quality)
  11. Many girls participated in the programme. (Adjective of number)
  12. All children need love. (Adjective of number)
  13. Neither answer is correct. (Distributive adjective)
  14. He won the first prize. (Definitive numeral adjective)



Adjectives That Can Be Followed By Infinitives


Infinitives are often used after adjectives which express people’s reactions and feelings. Common examples are: pleased, glad, surprised, happy, anxious, shocked, afraid etc.

Other adjectives that can be followed by infinitives include: right, wrong, stupid, certain, welcome, careful, due, fit, able, likely and lucky.

An infinitive can be used after adjective + noun to make a comment or judgment.

Superlative adjectives can be followed by an infinitive structure.

This structure is also common with first, second, third etc., next, last and only.




How To Know Whether A Word Is An Adjective


Adjectives are describing words. Here are a few tips to identify adjectives.

An adjective can exist in three forms: the positive, the comparative and the superlative. The word is probably an adjective, if you can add –er or –est to it. Or, if you can use more or most in front of it. The following words are all adjectives.

Adjectives can also be used with degree modifiers like very, quite or pretty.

Adjectives can be immediately followed by nouns.

Exercise

Identify the adjectives in the following sentences.

1. She is a nice person.

2. Suman has such a sweet voice.

3. Megha is perhaps the most industrious woman I know.

4. Krishna is cleverer than most boys his age.

5. Amar has won a prestigious award.

6. Ann has a lovely voice.

Answers

Nice, sweet, industrious, cleverer, prestigious, lovely




Distributive Adjectives


There are four distributive adjectives in English: each, everyeither and neither. Distributive adjectives are used with singular nouns and singular verbs.

Before a pronoun or a noun with a determiner (e.g. the, my, this), distributive adjectives are used with of.




Demonstrative Pronouns


Demonstrative pronouns direct attention to a specific person, place, or thing. There are only four demonstrative pronouns: this, that, these and those.

We use this/these to talk about people and things which are close to the speaker.

This/these can refer to situations and experiences which are going on or just about to start.

We use that/those to talk about people and things which are more distant from the speaker, or not present.

That/those can refer to experiences which have just finished, or which are most distant in the past.

See also:

Demonstrative adjectives




Demonstrative Adjectives


Demonstrative adjectives point out the person or thing concerned. Examples are: this, that, these and those.

Demonstrative adjectives are different from demonstrative pronouns. A demonstrative pronoun can stand alone. It is used to avoid the repetition of a noun.

A demonstrative adjective is followed by a noun. It is used to modify that noun.

Notes

This and that are used with singular nouns. These and those are used with plural nouns.




Degrees Of Comparison


English adjectives and adverbs commonly distinguish three degrees: the positive (the basic form), the comparative (expressing a higher degree than is present in something else) and the superlative (expressing a maximal degree).

Comparative and superlative adjectives: formation

The comparative is formed with –er or more; the superlative is formed with –est or most. One syllable adjectives like big and fast tend to prefer –er and –est. Larger ones like beautiful and carefully take more and most.

Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs

To say that people or things are unequal in a particular way, we can use comparative adjectives and adverbs.

Formation of the comparative and superlative

An adjective can exist in three forms – positive, comparative and superlative.

The positive

This is the basic form of the adjective. Examples are: kind, nice, beautiful, pleasant, tall, short, cruel, brave etc.

The comparative

One-syllable adjectives normally form their comparative by adding –er to the positive. Note that a syllable is a vowel-sound. One-syllable adjectives have just one vowel-sound. They might have more than one vowel, but when they are pronounced, only one vowel-sound is heard. Examples are given below: tall, short, cute, nice, brave, small, dark, fair etc.

We can change these one-syllable adjectives into the comparative by adding –er to them.

Tall –> taller

Short –> shorter

Cute –> cuter

Nice –> nicer

Brave –> braver

Small –> smaller

Dark –> darker

Fair –> fairer

Longer adjectives and adverbs form their comparative forms by adding more to the positive.

Beautiful –> more beautiful

Careful –> more careful

Pleasant –> more pleasant

Intelligent –> more intelligent

Practical –> more practical

The superlative

The superlative adjective shows a maximal degree of some quality. One syllable- adjectives form their superlative forms by adding –est to the positive.

Tall –> taller –> tallest

Short –> shorter –> shortest

Cute –> cuter –> cutest

Nice –> nicer –> nicest

Brave –> braver –> bravest

Small –> smaller –> smallest

Dark –> darker –> darkest

Fair –> fairer –> fairest

Longer adjectives form their superlative forms by adding most to the positive.

Beautiful –> more beautiful –> most beautiful

Careful –> more careful –> most careful

Pleasant –> more pleasant –> most pleasant

Intelligent –> more intelligent –> most intelligent

Practical –> more practical –> most practical

Irregular comparison

Some adjectives and adverbs have irregular comparative and superlative forms. That means their comparative and superlative forms are not formed from their positive.

Examples are given below.

Positive –> comparative –> superlative

Good –> better –> best

Bad –> worse –> worst

Ill –> worse –> worst

Little –> less –> least

Much / many –> more –> most

The superlative adjective is used to say that one of a group is outstanding in a particular way.




Adjectives | Attributive Position


Attributive adjectives go before the nouns they qualify.

Attributive adjectives after nouns

1. Attributive adjectives can be put after nouns. This happens in certain fixed phrases.

Examples are: Attorney General, court martial, poet laureate, time immemorial, heir apparent etc.

2. Certain adjectives ending in ‘-ible’ and ‘-able’ are also put after the nouns they qualify.

3. Adjectives are always placed after words like something, everything, anything, nothing, somebody, everybody, somewhere etc.

Adjectives used only in attributive position

Some adjectives are used only in attributive position.

Common examples are: elder, eldest, live, little, mere, sheer etc.

After a verb, other words must be used.