Because, Because Of, Due To, Owing To | Class 10 English Grammar Worksheets


Complete the following sentences using appropriate prepositions or conjunctions. Click here for a printer-friendly version of this worksheet.

1. We were late ……………………………. the car broke down on the way.

a) because b) because of c) either could be used here

2. …………………………. bad weather, the match was cancelled.

a) due to b) because c) either could be used here

3. His success was …………………………. his Dad.

a) because b) due to c) either could be used here

4. The meeting was postponed ………………………… the manager’s illness.

a) due to b) owing to c) either could be used here

5. The match was cancelled …………………………… the rain.

a) because of b) because c) either could be used here

6. …………………….. I worked fast, I finished early.

a) because b) due to c) either could be used here

7. We didn’t go out …………………………… the strike.

a) because b) because of c) either could be used here

8. If I am still alive that is ………………………… him.

a) because of c) owing to c) either could be used here

9. She succeeded ………………………….. her mother.

a) because of b) because c) either could be used here

10. …………………………. I didn’t like it, I didn’t buy it.

a) because b) due to c) either could be used here

Answers

1. We were late because the car broke down on the way.

2. Due to bad weather, the match was cancelled.

3. His success was due to his Dad.

4. The meeting was postponed due to/owing to the manager’s illness.

5. The match was cancelled because of the rain.

6. Because I worked fast, I finished early.

7. We didn’t go out because of the strike.

8. If I am still alive that is because of him.

9. She succeeded because of her mother.

10. Because I didn’t like it, I didn’t buy it.




Due To vs. Owing To vs. Because Of vs. On Account Of


Due to and owing to both mean because of. Phrases beginning with due/owing to are often separated from the rest of their sentence by a comma.

  • The flight was delayed, due/owing to bad weather.
  • The project has been cancelled, due/owing to lack of support.

Due to can be put after the verb be. Owing to cannot be used like this.

  • The delay was due to bad weather. (BUT NOT The delay was owing to bad weather.)
  • A lot of your unhappiness is due to boredom.
  • My success is due to my education.
Due to, owing to, on account of and because of are all prepositions with similar meanings. They are followed by nouns or noun phrases.

Study the following examples:

  • The man was detained because of his suspicious behaviour.
  • The man was detained due to his suspicious behaviour.
  • The man was detained owing to his suspicious behaviour.
  • The man was detained on account of his suspicious behaviour.

As you can see all of these prepositions are usually interchangeable.

  • The jet was grounded because of / on account of / due to / owing to engine trouble.
  • The match was cancelled due to / owing to / on account of / because of bad weather.

With preparatory it

All of these prepositions can be used with preparatory it.

  • It was because of / on account of / owing to / due to his hard work that he succeeded in life.
  • It was due to / owing to / because of / on account of traffic congestion that I missed my flight.
  • It was due to / owing to / because of / on account of illness that I failed my test.

Some people believe that it is wrong to use owing to after it is/was. However, this usage is also becoming acceptable now.

Due to, owing to and on account of are mainly used in a formal style. In a less formal style, we prefer the conjunction because. Note that a conjunction should be followed by a clause and not a noun.

  • The jet was grounded because it had engine trouble. (NOT The jet was grounded because engine trouble.)
  • The match was cancelled because it rained.
  • He succeeded because he worked hard.
  • The man was detained because his behaviour was suspicious.