Tagged: relative clauses

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Relative Clauses

Adjective clauses that begin with one of the relative pronouns (e.g. who, whom, whose, which and that) are also called relative clauses. Relative clauses are used to modify nouns and some pronouns – to identify people...

How To Combine Two Clauses With A Relative Pronoun

A complex sentence contains a main clause and one or more dependent clauses. One way of transforming a simple sentence into a complex sentence is by expanding an adjective or adjective phrase into an adjective clause. As...

Identifying Relative Clauses

Some relative clauses identify or classify nouns: they tell us which person or thing, or which kind of person or thing, is meant. These are called identifying, defining or restrictive relative clauses. Consider the example given below....

Adjective Clauses

Adjective clauses function as adjectives. They describe nouns and pronouns. Most adjective clauses start with the pronouns who, whom, which, that, whose, when, or where. Other pronouns like whoever, whatever, whomever, whichever, what and why can also start an adjective clause. Adjective clauses that...

Relative Clause

A relative clause is a clause introduced by a relative pronoun like who or which. Two common types of relative clauses exit: defining (or identifying) relative clause and non-defining (or non-identifying) relative clause. An...