Tagged: relative pronoun

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Relative Pronouns

Who, which and that can be the subjects of the verbs in relative clauses. Who refers to people and which to things; that can refer to both people and things. The boy who stole the watch was punished. (NOT The boy which stole …) It...

Relative Clauses

Adjective clauses that begin with one of the relative pronouns (e.g. who, whom, whose, which and that) are also called relative clauses. Relative clauses are used to modify nouns and some pronouns – to identify people...

Cases Where Relative Pronouns Are Omitted

Relative pronouns are words like that, who, which, whom, whose, where, when and why. The most common relative pronouns in English are who, whom, whose, that and which. In certain situations the words what, when and where can also function as relative pronouns. Relative pronouns introduce relative...

Relative Clause

A relative clause is a clause introduced by a relative pronoun like who or which. Two common types of relative clauses exit: defining (or identifying) relative clause and non-defining (or non-identifying) relative clause. An...

Pronouns

The part of speech which includes words like it, you, they, he, somebody, anything and who. A pronoun is usually a single word, and it forms a complete noun phrase all by itself. Pronouns...