Trouble

The word trouble is mainly used as an uncountable noun. That means it does not have a plural form. Also it is not normally used with numbers or the article a/an.

  • Incorrect: Most children who run away from their homes have had troubles with a close relative or family member.
  • Correct: Most children who run away from their homes have had trouble with a close relative or family member.
  • Incorrect: If you don’t want to have troubles with the law, you should mend your ways.
  • Correct: If you don’t want to have trouble with the law, you should mend your ways.

Trouble is commonly used as the object of the verbs get into and cause. Note that in this case, it is always used in the singular.

  • Martin’s parents are influential people. They bail him out whenever he gets into trouble. (NOT …. he gets into troubles.)
  • At that time I didn’t realize the trouble I had caused. (NOT … the troubles I had caused.)

The plural form troubles can be used to refer to all the problems that a person experiences. It is usually used with the possessive determiner my, his, her, their or our.

  • She seemed brooding over her troubles.

Expressions with trouble

Put someone to a lot of trouble:

  • I will never forgive him. He put me to a lot of trouble.

Take the trouble to do something

  • You may organize the party, but you will have to take the trouble to clean up before you leave.
  • Thank you for taking the trouble to visit me.

Take trouble over something / take trouble with something

  • She doesn’t take much trouble over / with her appearance.

Take a lot of trouble to do something

  • She took great trouble to make the party a success.
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Manjusha

Hi, I am Manjusha. This is my blog where I give English grammar lessons and worksheets. You may also want to check out my other blogs IELTS Practice and NCERT Guides

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