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Ways of expressing agreement

In this lesson, we will take a look at some of the phrases we can use to show agreement.

To show that you agree with something somebody has just said, use That’s right, You’re right or I know.

  • ‘I think she is a very popular writer.’ ‘You’re right. Her books are selling like crazy.’
  • ‘She’s really beautiful, isn’t she?’ ‘Oh, I know, you can’t take your eyes off her.’
  • ‘John and Susie are getting married.’ ‘That’s right. They got engaged last week.’

To say that you entirely agree with someone, use Exactly, Absolutely or I couldn’t agree more.

  • ‘Horrible weather, isn’t it?’ ‘Exactly. It’s ridiculously hot.’
  • ‘I think Susie is the best person for the job.’ ‘Absolutely. She’s got the right skills.’
  • ‘They’ve been running that school for several years, but they still don’t have proper accreditation. It’s ridiculous.’ ‘I couldn’t agree more.’

In a less formal style, use You can say that again! or You’re telling me!

  • ‘These dishonest politicians will ruin our country.’ ‘You can say that again!
  • ‘You can never rely on the public transport system.’ ‘You’re telling me! I’ve been waiting for a bus for over half an hour.’

In an informal style, use Why not? to show that you agree with a suggestion.

  • ‘I think we should throw a party in his honour.’ ‘Why not? He deserves it.’

Use I suppose so / I guess so when you agree with someone, but you are not exactly happy with the situation.

  • ‘I don’t think that the car is worth fixing. We’ll have to buy a new one.’ ‘I suppose so, but that’s going to be expensive.’
  • ‘I don’t think that we should wait for her. She isn’t going to come.’ ‘I guess so.

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