Author: Manjusha Nambiar

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What Are Nouns?

Nouns are most often the names of people, places or things. Personal names (e.g. John and Alice) and place-names (e.g. Mumbai and Chennai) are called proper nouns; they are usually used without articles. Nouns can be divided...

Noun Clause

A noun clause is a subordinate clause that functions as a noun. Because it functions as a noun, this clause can be a subject, direct object, indirect object, object of a preposition, predicate nominative, or appositive....

Nor

The conjunction nor is still in use, but it is becoming less common. So it might feel a bit odd when nor does come up in speech or writing. The most common use of nor is in the correlative pair, neither-nor....

How To Make Negatives In English

We make negative forms by putting not after an auxiliary verb. I do not smoke. He did not come. They are not expected to come. They have not been invited. She has not come. I cannot go. Basic rules 1. Do is used if there is no other auxiliary verb. After do, we...

Negative Questions

Negative questions are of two kinds: contracted and uncontracted. They have different word order. Contracted negative question Word order: auxiliary verb + n’t + subject Why don’t you listen to me? Don’t you understand? Hasn’t she any friends to...

Need As An Ordinary Verb And An Auxiliary Verb

Need is used both as an ordinary verb and as an auxiliary verb. As an ordinary verb As an ordinary verb need is used in the sense of ‘require’. It has the usual forms needs and needed. Ordinary need is...

Must vs. Have To

Both must and have to can be used to express the conclusion that something is certain. Note that have to is more common in American English. He must be mad to do this. (OR He has to be mad to...

Modal Auxiliary Verb Must

Must is a modal auxiliary verb. It has no –s in the third person singular. He must go. (NOT He musts go…) Must is followed by an infinitive without to. I must get some rest. You must finish the report today itself. You must...

Degree Modifiers With Comparatives And Superlatives

We cannot use very with comparatives. Instead we use other degree modifiers like much, far, very much, a lot, lots, any, no, rather, a little, a bit and even. She is much older than her husband. (NOT … very older than...