Care About vs. Care For vs. Take Care Of

  • I don’t care what happens.
  • ‘You have put on a lot of weight.’ ‘I don’t care.’

Before an object, we use care about. But note that about is usually dropped before a question word or a conjunction.

  • She never cared about her appearance.
  • I don’t care about your opinion.
  • I don’t care how much it costs. (NOT I don’t care about how much it costs.)
  • I don’t care whether it rains or not. (NOT I don’t care about whether it —)

Couldn’t care less

I couldn’t care less means I don’t care at all.

  • ‘She is really upset with you.’ ‘I couldn’t care less.’

Care for

Care for means have a liking for.

  • I really care for you, dear. (= I am really font of you, dear.)
  • Would you care for a cup of coffee? (= Would you like a cup of coffee?)

Care to

Care to can mean be willing to.

  • Would you care to go for a walk?

Take care of

Take care of means look after.

  • Nurses take care of sick people in hospital.

Take care means be on the watch.

  • Take care when you are crossing the road.

Take care is also used as a formula when saying goodbye.

  • ‘Bye Ann.’ ‘By Peter. Take care.’
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Manjusha Nambiar

I am the founder and editor of http://www.perfectyourenglish.com, http://www.ielts-practice.org, and http://ncertguides.com

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