Still, Yet, Already

Still is used to talk about an action or situation that has not finished.

  • She is still working.
  • The baby is still asleep.
  • We are still waiting for his reply.
  • It is still raining.

Yet

Yet is used to talk about something which has not happened – it is expected to happen in the future.

  • ‘Is Jane here?’ ‘Not yet’.
  • He hasn’t come yet.

In questions yet can be used to ask whether something expected has happened.

  • Have they arrived yet?
  • Is supper ready yet?

Yet is occasionally used in affirmative sentences. In that case it has a similar meaning to still.

  • We have yet to receive that parcel. (= We are still waiting to receive that parcel.)

Already

Already is used to say that something has happened sooner than expected.

  • We have already finished.
  • They have already arrived.
  • ‘When is she going to come?’ ‘She is already here.’

Notes

In British English, already and yet are commonly used with perfect tenses. In American English, past tenses are often preferred.

  • She has already arrived. (GB)
  • She already arrived. (US)
image_pdfimage_print

Manjusha Nambiar

Hi, I am Manjusha. This is my blog where I give English grammar lessons and worksheets.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *