Verb Patterns With As And Though

As and though can both be used after an adjective or an adverb. In this case, they mean although.

  • Hot as it was, we decided to go out. OR Hot though it was, we decided to go out. (= Although it was hot, we decided to go out.)
  • Tired as she was, she continued to work. OR Tired though she was, she continued to work. (= Although she was tired, she continued to work.)
  • Clever as he was, he could not solve the problem. OR Clever though he was, he could not solve the problem. (= Although he was clever, he could not solve the problem.)
  • Strange though it may seem, I don’t like to listen to music. OR Strange as it may seem, I don’t like to listen to music. (= Although it may seem strange, I don’t like to listen to music.)

In American English, these structures aren’t very common. Instead, Americans prefer using the structure as—as.

  • As hot as it was, we decided to go out. (= Although it was hot, we decided to go out.)
  • As beautiful as she is, she is not very popular among her friends. (= Although she is beautiful, she is not very popular among her friends.)

Occasionally as can be used in this construction to mean because.

  • Disturbed as she was, I decided to leave her alone. (= Because she was disturbed, I decided to leave her alone.) (NOT Although she was disturbed, I decided to leave her alone.)

Note that though cannot mean because in this construction.

image_pdfimage_print

Manjusha Nambiar

Hi, I am Manjusha. This is my blog where I give English grammar lessons and worksheets.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *