As, Since, Because, So

The words as, since and because can be used to refer to the reason for something. So is used to refer to the result.

  • It was a pleasant evening. And hence we decided to go out.

We can combine these two sentences into one in the following ways.

  • As it was a pleasant evening, we decided to go out.
  • We decided to go out because it was a pleasant evening.
  • Since it was a pleasant evening, we decided to go out.
  • It was a pleasant evening, so we decided to go out.

Notes

Clauses introduced by as and since usually come at the beginning of sentences. As and since-clauses are relatively formal. In a less formal style, we can express the same idea using so.

A because-clause can go either before or after the main clause.

  • My brother had refused to accompany me. And hence I went to the court alone.
  • As my brother had refused to accompany me, I went to the court alone.
  • Since my brother had refused to accompany me, I went to the court alone.
  • Because my brother had refused to accompany me, I went to the court alone. OR I went to the court alone because my brother had refused to accompany me.
  • My brother had refused to accompany me so I went to the court alone.

Notes

When a subordinate clause comes at the beginning of a sentence, we usually separate it with a comma.

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Manjusha Nambiar

I am the founder and editor of http://www.perfectyourenglish.com, http://www.ielts-practice.org, and http://ncertguides.com

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