Idiomatic expressions with heel

Study the following expressions, all of which have the word heel in them. Their meanings are also provided.

At one’s heels

When you have someone at your heels, they are walking close behind you.

Drag one’s heels

To drag your heels is to do something unwillingly and with deliberate delay.

To follow on the heels of

If something follows on the heels of something else, it happens very quickly or immediately after.

Under one’s heels

If something is under your heels, it is in your power and control.

Take to one’s heels

To take to your heels is to run away.

Exercise

Fill in the blanks with the appropriate expressions.

1. The thief had the police …………………….

2. The thief ……………………… as soon as he saw the cop.

3. Alexander wanted to have the entire world ………………….

4. The nuclear attack on Nagasaki ……………………. of the first attack on Hiroshima.

5. The government is …………………… on the Women’s Reservation Bill.

Answers

1. The thief had the police at his heels.

2. The thief took to his heels as soon as he saw the cop.

3. Alexander wanted to have the entire world under his heels.

4. The nuclear attack on Nagasaki followed close on the heels of the first attack on Hiroshima.

5. The government is dragging its heels on the Women’s Reservation Bill.

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Manjusha Nambiar

I am the founder and editor of http://www.perfectyourenglish.com, http://www.ielts-practice.org, and http://ncertguides.com

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